Where will it end

This topic contains 18 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  charlie 2 months, 3 weeks ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)
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  • #34063

    andyfrost
    Participant

    I suspect like many of you in these times , I’m spending a little more time trawling the well known auction site.
    I see many things have rocketed in price , but one item took my breath away…..£450 for a Howard Gem ridger.

    Andy.

    #34065

    ted20
    Participant

    the simple answer when it is all over ignore these particular sellers there are more people breaking machines than selling full machines

    #34066

    andyfrost
    Participant

    True , and due to the ridiculous prices they ask , these breakers will not sell half of it , eventually alot of these parts will be lost/dumped , the end result being another machine that sadly will never see the light of day again.

    Andy.

    #34078

    charlie
    Keymaster

    There are some very strange prices on that site. There has been a Shay Rotogardener which keeps reappearing listed at a starting price of £1000. The seller has been told on more than one occasion he has decimal point in wrong place.

    #34082

    trusty220
    Keymaster

    ……and that’s without mentioning the Trusty at £1750! Where on earth do they get their prices from?

    #34085

    alan
    Participant

    At the other end of the scale, I bought some brochures last week with free postage. Made an offer that was accepted by the seller, when they turned up the seller had paid more for the postage than I had for the brochures. They’d made a loss after taking into account the postage, listing fees and Paypal. I wonder if they were aware?

    #34095

    hdtrust
    Participant

    Last night I was looking at some Colwoods for sale,there is one in Northern Ireland,rusty as hell and no tools for £80,buyer collects,does the idiot know there is a lock down and the item is not on the essential list.To ship that out of Ireland to the main land anywhere will cost £188 inc Vat on a pallet.There is another in Hull for £85,shipping again would be £166 inc Vat,
    Just remember its not the price of the machine,its getting it back.
    There is though a very early version that has been restored at some point,with a starting price of £200 which includes shipping to your door,Looking at the other 2 and even weighing the cost up of collecting in normal times,that sounds a really good deal,which ever way you look at it,collecting is always the hidden cost.
    Its on Wallingfield perhaps one person looking outside the box

    #34096

    joegrgraham
    Participant

    Am I imagining the asking price of the trusty steed that has appeared today??

    #34097

    hdtrust
    Participant

    No you are not,asking price £10,000! You can always ask,he’s got another rare tractor on for £5,000 also a LDV motorcycle,rare for £20,000 I wonder if it comes with rust like the LDV vans,mine did not have rust,that had gone years ago,it just had a hole between my feet that you could see the road from, better than through the windscreen!

    #34098

    charlie
    Keymaster

    I am guessing the claimed pedigree of the Trusty Steed is why the ridiculous price tag. Looking at the sellers other items I wondered how they come to have several ex Kew Transport Museum items? Googling Kew Transport Museum shows the seller was the director of Kew Transport Museum, so it would appear he is selling the museum collection, the YouTube video may give reason why.. see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oog1i6_7YhY

    • This reply was modified 3 months, 1 week ago by  charlie.
    #34102

    andyfrost
    Participant

    It would appear to be a fairly ordinary Trusty Steed , not exactly plentiful , and on the other hand far from what I would term as rare , where it comes from or from whom has little relevance as to its so called rarity.
    Some folks notion of rarity is astounding , there was a Merry Tiller on the site recently that was claimed as being rare , built in 1948 , and was supposedly on of 48 to have come from over the pond !!!!!.

    Andy.

    #34103

    franktonpaget
    Participant

    The other tractor listed by this seller is a “K.J Hemingway Tractor”

    Mr K.J Hemingway was the managing director of Pattisons based at Stanmore at the time in a former brewery, a lovely old fashioned gentleman he entertained me to tea and biscuits in his office back in 1981 when I was doing some research on a Pattison RCT tractor I had. He pulled down a ledger which handwritten recorded all the machine they supplied, buyer, specification, attachments etc. I wonder did it survive as the company later sold the city centre site for redevelopment and moved to a industrial estate in St Albans.
    Pattisons had started in late Victorian times making shoes for ponies or donkeys pulling mowers to prevent damage to the turf and made all sorts of tools and equipment for sportsgrounds, golfcourses and parks. From the 1920’s they made light tractors based on Ford and Bedford light commercials for towing gang mowers but also with bodies and attachments for ground maintenance developing into the Pattison Worthington light tractor before WW2 and then the RCT tractors post war.
    I do not think the tractor advertised is a recognised Pattison product but probably something assembled by Mr Hemmingway, the steering wheel/throttle looks from a President tractor, it looks to have three gearboxes possibly of Ford origin and the back axle looks 1920/1930 commercial with the tyre arrangement similar to that found on Pattison grounds tractors.
    I can quite see Mr Hemingway walking through the spares department pulling obsolete parts to assemble a light tractor for his own use, it would be interesting to trace the 1966 registration to see how it is described.
    Mr Hemingway contributed to a article on the Pattison company in the Old Glory magazine some years back and is probably no longer with us as he was a late middle aged man when I met him nearly 40 years ago

    #34121

    hdtrust
    Participant

    Just to correct you on the history of Pattison as a company in 1901 they started out making shooting Galleries for fairs before making Horse boots for horses working on lawns,their first factory was Streatham SW16 London, and their first patent was in 1916 for the Pulviette sprinkler,taken later up by Lloyd’s of Letchworth.
    Archivist
    The Hall & Duck Trust

    #34287

    franktonpaget
    Participant

    How interesting, it is always surprising what companies were involved in. On holiday in Sri Lanka we visited a tea factory and some of the tea processing machinery had been manufactured by Ransomes in 1948 and was still in use. Sadly more modern machinery came from China.

    During this isolation period I have been reading some Allens of Oxford company employee newsletters which were issued four times a year and there is a story of the fairground roundabouts manufactured in the 1920’s by Allens where employees who could be spared were called to test ride the gallopers. The second produced was exhibited at the 1924 Wembley exhibition.

    #34288

    charlie
    Keymaster

    I have just bought a few more copies of Allen’s Activities, my collection now runs 1-30, 33/34, 37-44. (31/32, 35/36 missing ). Due to problems they had getting issues out on time some are combined eg; 25/26; 33/34; 37/38; 39/40; 41/42; so I am not sure if the ones I don’t have are single or double issues. I also have a few duplicates.
    They contain some good articles about Allen products and give a good insight to the company activities.

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