New Trusty Greyhound Transfer

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This topic contains 11 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  trusty220 1 week, 3 days ago.

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  • #36511

    trusty220
    Keymaster

    Here’s something for all you Trusty owners and enthusiasts. I’ve just managed to buy some original transfers and one of them is the Trusty Greyhound one that sticks on the right hand side of the plough headstock. If you’ve never seen one I’ve included a picture of the inside page of the spiral bound brochure so that you can see it in position; and no, that isn’t Mrs. Geoff driving it before you ask!

    Now, here’s the question- if I were to get a batch professionally made how many of you would be interested in buying one or two for your tractors? I’m only asking to get some idea of how much interest there would be.

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    #36522

    trusty220
    Keymaster

    A little more information before you commit. By the time I’ve paid for the artwork it looks like I’ll have to charge about £7.50 each; they will be very high quality vinyl stickers rather than waterslide transfers.

    Is anyone interested? I won’t hold you to it if you decide to change your mind later.

    #36524

    trusty-mad
    Participant

    Id be interested. Were these put on all the plough headstocks or just the ones sold with the greyhound plough?

    #36526

    trusty220
    Keymaster

    As far as I know they were a standard fitment on the headstock, Robert. When you consider most headstocks were sold with a plough underneath then added to at a later date with other attachments, that would probably mean that the majority had the sticker on.

    #36556

    kmacaoidh
    Participant

    I’d be tempted by those Greyhound plough stickers Geoff, if I ever get to that degree of finish on the Trusty equipments I have! Is it a set of stickers, one on both sides of the headstock, or just the one? Also, are the stickers set for the tractor still available? It would make sense to get the lot when we’re at it? I’ll keep an eye on progress.

    #36557

    trusty220
    Keymaster

    There was only one fitted to the right hand side of the headstock. The left hand side had a maker’s plate rivetted in the place it would go.

    I can combine the postage if you want a set of Trusty transfers as well as a Greyhound one; I still have a few Trusty waterslide transfers left. For prices see the Classified Adverts in the back of The Cultivator.

    #36649

    trusty220
    Keymaster

    I’m told that the artwork for these stickers is nearly finished so I’ve taken a little time out to fettle up a headstock to put the first one onto. I had the idea that I would make up a display of all of the Trusty tools that fit to the headstock, so this is the first stage.

    I don’t know about you, but it’s ages since I’ve tried to get one of these apart and it certainly brought back many unhappy memories struggling with this one. All of the bolt-on parts came off easily but where I always struggle is getting the pin out of the front casting to separate the front from the back. The pin normally rusts itself to the casting and you just cannot get enough heat into it to get the pin to move- until now, that is! Back to the farm with a few wooden pallets I went, filled up the oil drum with them, chucked a bit of old hay in to get it started then go for a cup of tea. By the time I came back it had settled down to a lovely red glow all around the drum with a thick covering of hot embers across the bottom. I put the headstock in (minus the aluminium cast pieces) and filled it up again with more pallet wood. After a short while the whole assembly was glowing red so I left it to burn out and cool down. That night the pin came out with a bit of persuasion from the lump hammer but it wasn’t easy- the technique is to knock it backwards and forwards, dosing it with oil and WD40 every time. Eventually it moves more and more until it comes out completely.

    I have now got it to the paint stage, so not long now!

    PS Normally using this technique I pull the red hot metal out of the fire and plunge it into the stream to crack the rust seal by using differential expansion/contraction. This works well if you have a steel fabrication but I didn’t trust it with cast iron; you only break it once!

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    #36757

    trusty220
    Keymaster

    The artwork is now finished and the next stage will be production. Nearly there!

    As an update I thought that it would look better with a plough underneath it as well, so off to the farm again and dug out a plough. Everything was seized solid with rust so into the fire it went and after a five minute cooling off in the stream the bolts came undone with no trouble at all. I am now embarking on a marathon wire-wheel process because the parts are too big to put into the bucket to use electrolysis.

    Pictures in due course.

    #36987

    trusty220
    Keymaster

    Sorry for the delay but farm work has been taking over now the warm weather is here. The plough is now almost finished with only a few little pieces to touch up with paint. The problem I was finding a few weeks back was that the paint wouldn’t dry because it was far too cold in the garage; no such problems now that the temperature has moved up the scale!

    When I chose this plough it was because it had been used and abused in a previous life and it was even doubtful that it would work again. I think somebody has driven over it at some point as the mouldboard seems to be a little narrow but it will be fine as a static exhibit to show off at a show. I’ve had to make another landslide because the old one was almost worn away completely and the mouldboard was so badly pitted I could not successfully grind out the deep pits and leave enough metal behind. The only way to rescue it was to de-rust and fill it with filler to smooth it out; painting afterwards was very successful with a base coat of grey primer, two coats of chrome finish Rust-O-Leum enamel then three coats of clear lacquer. It looks like polished steel!

    On the transfer front I have had some samples back but there are issues concerning the colour combinations. We have had to settle for waterslide transfers to get the colour match exact but seeing as that was what the originals were made like I can’t object; the only problem is that I’m going to have to order considerably more of them to get the price down to a reasonable figure.

    Anyway, here are some pictures of the plough just to keep you quiet until they arrive!

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    #37141

    kmacaoidh
    Participant

    Well done Geoff, the plough is looking great. That’s the same green the Trusty Tractor would be painted/sprayed with on the factory floor? What exact green is it, and where best to find it?
    The plough share and slide do look like polished steel as well! It was all look great with a small splash of colour when the stickers go on. By the way, im still interested in those stickers. Its just like yourself,there’s so much work and distractions, ive not even got close to cleaning up my own Trusty, Greyhound or anything! But they are dry and safe, a first step to any restoration and preservation?

    When i see how well you, and others, have conserved these tractors and equipment, i have to pinch myself that these things are not being still made! And are looking after things that will never be made again!

    Unless you’ve heard they are going to start making Trusty Tractors again, due to increased interest and demand!?

    Keep up the good work

    #37142

    kmacaoidh
    Participant

    Also, I always have to chuckle when i see a Greyhound plough, thinking of your words, in your Trusty book i believe, referring to an original advert for the plough, saying it ‘could be fitted or dismounted easily by one man. Yes, if you want to give yourself a hernia’ !

    #37146

    trusty220
    Keymaster

    The exact shade of green would vary quite a bit but the most common shade for the mid- to late- 1940’s machines is a Dark Brunswick Green, otherwise known as British Racing Green. Prior to 1945 the shade seems to have been lighter and so a Mid Brunswick Green would be more appropriate. After 1950 they changed to Apple Green, which has an equivalent in today’s colours as Amazone Green, although Fendt Green will give a slightly more weathered look if you want the machinery to look a little older.

    The paint that I have used is some that was left over from painting the garage door! It is British Racing Green, though, and is made by Sandtex and labelled “10 year Exterior Gloss” which sounded just what I needed! It does give a very glossy finish that lasts so I can thoroughly recommend it.

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